Taylor-Bergen2

A woman explore Bergen's Bryggen neighborhood.

It’s no secret that the Norwegian fjords are one of the main reasons people travel to Norway. They’re incredible! Overall, there are around 1,200 fjords in Norway and one of the best ways to see them is by doing a road trip from Bergen to Hardangerfjord.   

When deciding which fjords to visit in Norway, one of the best is Hardangerfjord – the Queen of the Fjords. It’s the fifth-longest fjord on the planet and the second-longest in Scandinavia. Starting from the Atlantic Ocean, Hardangerfjord expands 111 miles into mainland Norway. Another reason for visiting Hardangerfjord from Bergen is because it’s also a renowned cider region.

A Hardangerfjord cider orchard.

People have been traveling to the Hardangerfjord region since the beginning of the 19th Century. This area of Norway has many memorable things to do, from hiking to cruising to cider tasting.

Discover why doing a road trip from Bergen to Hardangerfjord is one of the best things to do during a visit to Norway. Learn more about the best Scandinavia itinerary for 14 days during summer.

**Please note that this blog post uses affiliate links meaning that if you make a purchase via my affiliate link, I receive a small commission at no additional cost to you. I only promote and talk about products and services that I have used and like.


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Best Norway Road Trip from Bergen to Hardangerfjord

Traveling to Hardangerfjord:

The Hardangerfjord cider region in Norway.

One of the best ways to visit the Norwegian fjords is by driving from the city of Bergen to Hardangerfjord. Since we started our Norway trip in Oslo, we took a short flight to Bergen, where I began my adventure.

Nowadays, there are more direct international flights going to Bergen. Still, for the most part, unless you’re already traveling through Norway, you’ll most likely have to fly into Oslo Airport Gardemoen first. From Oslo, there are numerous direct flights daily to Bergen Airport. You can find affordable flights through Skyscanner.

Another way you can get from Oslo to Bergen is by taking the Bergensbanen, otherwise known as the Bergen Railway. Taking the train from Oslo to Bergen is one of the best ways to see the incredible landscapes of Norway. The train journey is a little over seven hours and there are 180 tunnels and 22 stops to enjoy.

Overall, the Bergensbanen is Northern Europe’s highest railway. The trains offer passengers a comfortable experience and a café where you can purchase snacks and beverages. During the journey, you’ll also experience vast forests, glistening lakes, towering mountains, small scenic islands and a great view of the fjords and waterfalls.

You’ll most likely need a rental car for a road trip from Bergen to Hardangerfjord. Everything in Hardangerfjord is spread out and it’s hard to rely on public transportation there. (You do not need an international driver’s license to rent a car in Norway.)

Is Bergen Worth Visiting and Spending Time At?

The UNESCO Bryggen neighborhood in Bergen, Norway.

After flying into Bergen, before traveling to Hardangerfjord, I recommend spending time in the city because it is beautiful and offers a lot to do!

Located on the west coast of Norway, Bergen is surrounded by mountains and fjords, making it known as the city of the seven mountains. It’s the second largest city in Norway, behind Oslo. It includes Bryggen, a picturesque Old Town and a UNESCO World Heritage Site boasting timeless wooden houses on a picturesque harbor.

An important thing to note about visiting Bergen, Norway is that it’s one of the rainiest places on Earth. It experiences an average of 231 days of rainfall annually and summers are cold. It’s best to pack accordingly by bringing sweaters, pants, warm socks, boots, etc. (Don’t do what I did and pack solely for summer. I ended up catching a cold.)

Bergen is worth visiting, especially during the summer season. Even if you don’t plan to stay in the city, it makes for a wonderful day trip in Western Norway. Below are the best things to do in Bergen, Norway:

Stroll through Bergen’s Bryggen Neighborhood:
A woman strolling through Bryggen in Norway.

Bergen’s Old Town is one of the most charming areas of Norway. It’s a cultural heritage site on the Hanseatic Wharf and is famous for its wooden buildings that date back to the Middle Ages.

One of the best things to do in Bergen’s Bryggen neighborhood is to stroll the cobbled streets and wander into one of the many stores, restaurants, galleries and museums. Bryggen is also one of the most photogenic spots in the city.

The best restaurant to eat at in Bryggen is Enhjørningen Fiskerestaurant (The Unicorn Fish Restaurant) for local food, especially seafood, and cozy vibes. During my evening at this lovely restaurant, I had catfish with shellfish and potatoes with red wine and it was amazing! Additionally, a great bar to visit afterward to enjoy live music, Norwegian beer and a fun time is Sjøboden.

A Norwegian seafood dinner from The Unicorn Restaurant in Bergen.

You must also visit Godt Brød Marken for delicious Norwegian baked goods and comforting coffee to fuel yourself up for the day. What I loved about visiting this bakery was that there was both indoor and outdoor seating.

Gødt Brod in Bergen, Norway.
Coffee and a Norwegian cinnaon roll.

Two of the most popular attractions in the Bryggen neighborhood when traveling from Bergen to Hardangerfjord are the Fisketorget i Bergen (Bergen Fish Market) and the Bergenhus Fortress.

The Bergen Fish Market has been around since the 13th Century and was always a gathering location for merchants and fishermen. Not only can you get fresh local fish and seafood from this spot, but there’s also lush fruit to enjoy. The indoor fish market is open year-round, but the outdoor market is only open from May through August.

Recognized as one of Norway’s oldest and best-preserved fortifications, Bergenhus Fortress was built in the early 1500s but wasn’t complete until around 1700. It was used throughout the centuries and during World War II but is now a place for the Norwegian military.

Bergenhus Fortress is open to the public and is free to visit. The fortress annually hosts concerts, events, festivals, galleries, markets, and more.

Museums you must visit in Bryggen are The Hanseatic Museum and Schøtstuene, where you can learn about the Hanseatic merchants who traded for 400 years, and the Bryggens Museum, which showcases the archaeological excavations of Bryggen from the 1955 fire that took out a lot of the older buildings in Bergen.

The Hanseatic Museum tickets cost 150 NOK for adults 18 and older, 75 NOK for students, 100 NOK for Bergen Card holders and it’s free for those under 18. There’s discounted pricing in the winter: 120 NOK for adults and 60 NOK for students. The Bryggens Museum costs 140 NOK for adults 18 years and older, 80 NOK for students and it’s free for those under 18 and Bergen Card holders.

Ride the Funicular to Mount Fløyen:
The Floibanen funicular at Mount Fløyen in Bergen.

One of the most memorable things to do in Bergen, Norway is to ride the Floibanen funicular to the top of Mount Fløyen, which offers breathtaking views of the city, mountains and fjord.

Prices for the funicular are 160 NOK for adults and seniors aged 16 and over and 80 NOK for children during the summer. In the winter, tickets are discounted to 120 NOK for adults and 60 NOK for children and seniors. There’s a 50% discount on round-trip tickets for Bergen Card holders.

At the top of Mount Fløyen is a cozy café and souvenir shop. Since Norway is usually chillier, Fløistuen Shop & Café is a lovely spot to warm up to hot drinks and enjoy homemade chocolates.

Where to Stay in Bergen and Hardangerfjord:

Staying at Ullensavang Hotel during a Bergen to Hardangerfjord road trip.

From dreamy spa hotels to luxury city escapes, there are a lot of great hotels to choose from that suit all budgets, from Bergen to Hardangerfjord.

I stayed at the Moxy Bergen on the water in the Solheim Nord area during my trip. It’s a Marriott Bonvoy hotel near Bergen Airport, the Bergen bus and train station.

Along Hardangerfjord, my friend Caitlin and I stayed at the Ullensavang Hotel in Lofthus. This hotel holds a variety of activities and water sports to enjoy along the fjord. It offers jaw-dropping views of Folgefonna Glacier, which is part of Folgefonna National Park. It’s one of the most powerful glaciers in Norway.

Below are other great hotels to stay at in Bergen and Hardangerfjord based on budget:

Bergen:

Luxury Accommodation: Opus XVI (Opus 16)

Boutique Accommodation: The Hanseatic Hotel

Mid-Budget Accommodation: Radisson Blu Royal Hotel Bergen

Budget Accommodation: HI Bergen Hostel Montana

Hardangerfjord:

Luxury Accommodation: Hotel Ullensvang

Boutique Accommodation: Brakanes Hotel

Mid-Budget Accommodation: Tyssedal Hotel

Budget Accommodation: Hardanger Hostel B&B

You can also find a variety of rental properties from Bergen to Hardangerfjord.

Road Trip from Bergen to Hardangerfjord:

A road trip from Bergen to Hardangerfjord.

Western Norway is unique and one of the best ways to experience it is by road trip from Bergen to Hardangerfjord.

Known as the second longest fjord in Norway, Hardangerfjord is one of the most breathtaking places to visit in the country. It has calming waters and panoramic views of steep mountains, dramatic waterfalls, cider farms and more.

You can visit Hardangerfjord from Bergen through various transportation options. However, renting a car and enjoying a scenic drive from Bergen is the best way to experience the area and see everything. There are a lot of beautiful spots to stop at, take photos, do tours and more.

Depending on where you’re going in Hardangerfjord, it can take you anywhere from an hour to over a two-and-a-half-hour drive from Bergen. (If you’re traveling to Ullensvang, Lofthus or Tyssedal, it will be around a two-hour and 40-minute drive from Bergen.)

The fjords of Norway.

If you plan to take public transport around Norway, you can take the Skyss bus from Bergen busstasjon to Mundheim in Hardangerfjord. Additionally, you can also do an express boat trip from Bergen to Hardangerfjord through Rødne, which has daily departures. You can also do a private day tour to Hardangerfjord from Bergen.

During your time in Hardangerfjord, you can get around by car, the Skyss bus, a fjord cruise through Norled and ferries run by Fjord1.

Please be mindful when driving from Bergen to Hardangerfjord. The roads are narrow and windy. You can also experience this breathtaking region during the train ride from Bergen to Oslo and vice versa.

See the Fantoft Stave Church:

The Fantoft Stave Church outside of Bergen.

The first thing you should do on your road trip from Bergen to Hardangerfjord is stop at Fantoft Stave Church. It’s located in the Fana borough of Bergen and is a reconstructed stave church after a 1992 arson fire that burnt down the original structure.

The old stave church was constructed in 1170 and is a large wooden structure to be admired. It will take you back in time!

You can visit the Fantoft Stave Church from mid-May through the end of September, Monday through Sunday, from 11 am to 4 pm. It costs 74 NOK for adults, 35 NOK for children and 50 NOK for students. Visiting the church is free for Bergen Card holders.

Enjoy a Hardanger Fjord Cruise:

Hardangerfjord cider region.

A visit to one of Norway’s most popular tourist destinations is incomplete without doing a fjord cruise.

There are numerous boat cruise tours you can take in Hardangerfjord. Still, some of the best things you’ll see are the stunning fjord landscapes, spectacular waterfalls, epic Trolltunga, beautiful glaciers and picturesque cideries.

What’s great about doing a fjord cruise in this region is that it usually includes visiting one or more local cideries.

Participate in a Local Cider Tasting:

Cider tasting at Alde Sider on a Bergen to Hardangerfjord road trip.

Hardanger Cider is a geographically protected brand name like the Champagne region in France. Hardangerfjord in Norway is known for its apples that have been pressed and processed to perfection for generations.

One of the best things to do in Hardangerfjord is a cider safari that will take you to several idyllic orchards. The best time to do a cider safari is during summertime. The Aurora of The Fjords will allow you to make memories while enjoying the beauty and tastes of Hardangerfjord.

If you’re doing a road trip and plan to stop at a cidery during your journey, the best place to do a tour and tasting is Alde Sider in Nå. It’s a family-owned cidery that uses Aroma apples. They were also awarded the best cider in Norway in 2018.

After a wonderful experience cider tasting at Alde Sider, a fantastic fine dining restaurant to enjoy afterward is Siderhuset Ola K. It’s set in a wooden house from 1912 that was owned by Ola K Naa who would help locals with retail, fruit delivery, mail and more. The restaurant is a unifying place for all and most Hardanger ciders are represented there.

Trolltunga during the summer.
Please note that I ended up not completing Trolltunga due to heavy fog. This is a stock image of the Troll’s Tongue on a clear summer day.

Hiking Trolltunga during a trip to Hardangerfjord from Bergen is a must, especially if you’re an adventure lover! Meaning troll’s tongue, Trolltunga is one of the most epic and breathtaking cliffs in Western Norway.

Trolltunga – Little Preikestolen is located 3,610 feet above sea level and is a 14.3-mile challenging out-and-back trail. It’s situated near the village of Tyssedal and takes around seven and a half hours to complete round-trip.

Some important information about hiking Trolltunga is that starting as early as possible, preferably no later than 8 am is best. Also, this trail is open for hikers to conquer from June 1 through September 30, but you must go with a guide from October 1 through May 31.

There is paid parking at Trolltunga with three lots. You can save yourself a lot of time by either making reservations to park at P3, where the official start of the hike is located, or take one of the many shuttles that run every half hour from 6:30 am to 7 pm from lots P2 in Skjeggedal and P1 in Tyssedal. If you finish the hike after 7 pm, you must walk down to the parking lots, which can take two to three hours.

Please note that you can make reservations for the P3 lot, but it must be done in advance since this is a heavily trafficked hike. It costs 600 NOK to park at P3. You do not need to make reservations for the P2 and P1 lots. It costs 200 NOK to park at the P2 lot.

The start of Trolltunga can be strenuous and monotonous, but it gets more exciting as you ascend. There’s a 3,113-foot elevation gain and dogs are also welcome on this trail.

Once you get to the tongue, there will most likely be a queue of people taking photos. Please note that depending on the day and weather, the line to get pictures on the tongue can be up to two hours! Weekends are always when Trolltunga draws more hikers.

A woman hiking in the fog.

Unfortunately, we didn’t have the best of luck on Trolltunga. The weather was horrible and the entire mountain was covered in a thick fog. Since you couldn’t see much of anything, we decided to make the tough decision to not continue the hike because it would’ve been a waste of a day. (We ended up spending more time at the cideries.)

Overall, the views at Trolltunga are some of the most breathtaking in Northern Europe and you’ll make memories that will last you a lifetime.

Before hiking Trolltunga, it’s best to stop at a grocery store to pick up water, snacks and a rain poncho in case of inclement weather. (Don’t forget that Norway is a rainy country.)

Having the proper hiking gear like trekking boots, a hefty day pack, hiking socks, a rain jacket/windbreaker, an insulated coat with layers, gloves, a beanie and more is also essential. Referencing my Mount Kilimanjaro packing list is a great way to be prepared for Trolltunga.

Pizza and beer from Lofthus Ekspedisjon in the Norwegian Fjords.
Fløy Bakeri in Lofthus, Norway.

After completing the Trolltunga hike, head to downtown Lofthus and treat yourself to a flight of beer or cider and pizza at Lofthus Ekspedisjon. A charming bakery in the area is Fløy Bakeri.

Visit the Best Hardanger Region Waterfalls:

Seeing waterfalls on a road trip from Bergen to Hardangerfjord.

It’s no secret that the Hardangerfjord region is named “The King of Waterfalls.” During your Bergen to Hardangerfjord road trip, you must take the time to stop at one of the many breathtaking waterfalls to take in the views, enjoy a hike, capture stunning photos and more.

Below are the best waterfalls to visit in Hardangerfjord:

Vøringsfossen: Known as the most famous waterfall in the region, Vøringsfossen is in Hardangervidda National Park and has a nearly 600-foot water plunge into the Måbødalen Valley. The best viewing platform is at Fossli Hotel.

Låtefossen in Norway.

Låtefossen: One of the most accessible waterfalls to visit in the Hardangerfjord is Låtefossen. It’s a twin waterfall in the Odda Valley, over 540 feet. Parking on the main road 13 between Odda and Rødal is the best way to see this beautiful waterfall.

Steinsdalfossen: Another enchanting waterfall to check out on a road trip from Bergen to Hardangerfjord is Steinsdalsfossen. What’s cool about visiting this 164-foot waterfall is that you can walk behind it!


The Old Town of Bergen, Norway.

Check out these other awesome articles:

14 Best Countries to Visit in August in the World

The Best Cabin in Norway: An Escape to Stord Island

Things to do in Andorra from Barcelona

I hope you all enjoyed discovering the best things to do during a Bergen to Hardangerfjord road trip. If you have any questions, please email me at info@browneyedflowerchild.com.

Basic Facts of Norway:

Currency: Norwegian Krone, Capital: Oslo, Time Zone: Central European Standard Time

*Anything could happen during your travels. Always make sure you are insured in case there are unforeseen circumstances such as lost luggage/theft, natural disasters, personal liabilities and more. Click here to get insured for your next trip.

In addition, a great and secure luggage storage to utilize during your summer Europe trip is Nannybag! It is easy to use; all you do is download the Nannybag app, type in the city that you will be visiting and when you plan to arrive and depart. At a small cost per luggage, Nannybag will list the stores, restaurants or hotels where you could drop your bag off at the city you are visiting.

Nannybag is also insured against theft, loss and breakage. It’s a convenient way to store your bags when you are traveling from one city to the next in Europe.

Shop my Norwegian Fjords Look:

Click here to shop my Poshmark closet!

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2 Comments

  1. Kim Deer on October 11, 2023 at 10:18 pm

    Great article Taylor on the beautiful Norwegian Fjords! Looks like you saw some breathtaking landscapes. I loved all the cool architecture ~ great guide for an awesome road trip in Norway. Love you, mom 👩🏻 xoxo 💖

    • Taylor Deer on October 13, 2023 at 9:10 am

      Thank you mom! The Norwegian Fjords are the highlight of visiting Norway.

Leave a Comment





Taylor-Bergen2

A woman explore Bergen's Bryggen neighborhood.

It’s no secret that the Norwegian fjords are one of the main reasons people travel to Norway. They’re incredible! Overall, there are around 1,200 fjords in Norway and one of the best ways to see them is by doing a road trip from Bergen to Hardangerfjord.   

When deciding which fjords to visit in Norway, one of the best is Hardangerfjord – the Queen of the Fjords. It’s the fifth-longest fjord on the planet and the second-longest in Scandinavia. Starting from the Atlantic Ocean, Hardangerfjord expands 111 miles into mainland Norway. Another reason for visiting Hardangerfjord from Bergen is because it’s also a renowned cider region.

A Hardangerfjord cider orchard.

People have been traveling to the Hardangerfjord region since the beginning of the 19th Century. This area of Norway has many memorable things to do, from hiking to cruising to cider tasting.

Discover why doing a road trip from Bergen to Hardangerfjord is one of the best things to do during a visit to Norway. Learn more about the best Scandinavia itinerary for 14 days during summer.

**Please note that this blog post uses affiliate links meaning that if you make a purchase via my affiliate link, I receive a small commission at no additional cost to you. I only promote and talk about products and services that I have used and like.


Pin the Below Image to Keep Handy

Best Norway Road Trip from Bergen to Hardangerfjord

Traveling to Hardangerfjord:

The Hardangerfjord cider region in Norway.

One of the best ways to visit the Norwegian fjords is by driving from the city of Bergen to Hardangerfjord. Since we started our Norway trip in Oslo, we took a short flight to Bergen, where I began my adventure.

Nowadays, there are more direct international flights going to Bergen. Still, for the most part, unless you’re already traveling through Norway, you’ll most likely have to fly into Oslo Airport Gardemoen first. From Oslo, there are numerous direct flights daily to Bergen Airport. You can find affordable flights through Skyscanner.

Another way you can get from Oslo to Bergen is by taking the Bergensbanen, otherwise known as the Bergen Railway. Taking the train from Oslo to Bergen is one of the best ways to see the incredible landscapes of Norway. The train journey is a little over seven hours and there are 180 tunnels and 22 stops to enjoy.

Overall, the Bergensbanen is Northern Europe’s highest railway. The trains offer passengers a comfortable experience and a café where you can purchase snacks and beverages. During the journey, you’ll also experience vast forests, glistening lakes, towering mountains, small scenic islands and a great view of the fjords and waterfalls.

You’ll most likely need a rental car for a road trip from Bergen to Hardangerfjord. Everything in Hardangerfjord is spread out and it’s hard to rely on public transportation there. (You do not need an international driver’s license to rent a car in Norway.)

Is Bergen Worth Visiting and Spending Time At?

The UNESCO Bryggen neighborhood in Bergen, Norway.

After flying into Bergen, before traveling to Hardangerfjord, I recommend spending time in the city because it is beautiful and offers a lot to do!

Located on the west coast of Norway, Bergen is surrounded by mountains and fjords, making it known as the city of the seven mountains. It’s the second largest city in Norway, behind Oslo. It includes Bryggen, a picturesque Old Town and a UNESCO World Heritage Site boasting timeless wooden houses on a picturesque harbor.

An important thing to note about visiting Bergen, Norway is that it’s one of the rainiest places on Earth. It experiences an average of 231 days of rainfall annually and summers are cold. It’s best to pack accordingly by bringing sweaters, pants, warm socks, boots, etc. (Don’t do what I did and pack solely for summer. I ended up catching a cold.)

Bergen is worth visiting, especially during the summer season. Even if you don’t plan to stay in the city, it makes for a wonderful day trip in Western Norway. Below are the best things to do in Bergen, Norway:

Stroll through Bergen’s Bryggen Neighborhood:
A woman strolling through Bryggen in Norway.

Bergen’s Old Town is one of the most charming areas of Norway. It’s a cultural heritage site on the Hanseatic Wharf and is famous for its wooden buildings that date back to the Middle Ages.

One of the best things to do in Bergen’s Bryggen neighborhood is to stroll the cobbled streets and wander into one of the many stores, restaurants, galleries and museums. Bryggen is also one of the most photogenic spots in the city.

The best restaurant to eat at in Bryggen is Enhjørningen Fiskerestaurant (The Unicorn Fish Restaurant) for local food, especially seafood, and cozy vibes. During my evening at this lovely restaurant, I had catfish with shellfish and potatoes with red wine and it was amazing! Additionally, a great bar to visit afterward to enjoy live music, Norwegian beer and a fun time is Sjøboden.

A Norwegian seafood dinner from The Unicorn Restaurant in Bergen.

You must also visit Godt Brød Marken for delicious Norwegian baked goods and comforting coffee to fuel yourself up for the day. What I loved about visiting this bakery was that there was both indoor and outdoor seating.

Gødt Brod in Bergen, Norway.
Coffee and a Norwegian cinnaon roll.

Two of the most popular attractions in the Bryggen neighborhood when traveling from Bergen to Hardangerfjord are the Fisketorget i Bergen (Bergen Fish Market) and the Bergenhus Fortress.

The Bergen Fish Market has been around since the 13th Century and was always a gathering location for merchants and fishermen. Not only can you get fresh local fish and seafood from this spot, but there’s also lush fruit to enjoy. The indoor fish market is open year-round, but the outdoor market is only open from May through August.

Recognized as one of Norway’s oldest and best-preserved fortifications, Bergenhus Fortress was built in the early 1500s but wasn’t complete until around 1700. It was used throughout the centuries and during World War II but is now a place for the Norwegian military.

Bergenhus Fortress is open to the public and is free to visit. The fortress annually hosts concerts, events, festivals, galleries, markets, and more.

Museums you must visit in Bryggen are The Hanseatic Museum and Schøtstuene, where you can learn about the Hanseatic merchants who traded for 400 years, and the Bryggens Museum, which showcases the archaeological excavations of Bryggen from the 1955 fire that took out a lot of the older buildings in Bergen.

The Hanseatic Museum tickets cost 150 NOK for adults 18 and older, 75 NOK for students, 100 NOK for Bergen Card holders and it’s free for those under 18. There’s discounted pricing in the winter: 120 NOK for adults and 60 NOK for students. The Bryggens Museum costs 140 NOK for adults 18 years and older, 80 NOK for students and it’s free for those under 18 and Bergen Card holders.

Ride the Funicular to Mount Fløyen:
The Floibanen funicular at Mount Fløyen in Bergen.

One of the most memorable things to do in Bergen, Norway is to ride the Floibanen funicular to the top of Mount Fløyen, which offers breathtaking views of the city, mountains and fjord.

Prices for the funicular are 160 NOK for adults and seniors aged 16 and over and 80 NOK for children during the summer. In the winter, tickets are discounted to 120 NOK for adults and 60 NOK for children and seniors. There’s a 50% discount on round-trip tickets for Bergen Card holders.

At the top of Mount Fløyen is a cozy café and souvenir shop. Since Norway is usually chillier, Fløistuen Shop & Café is a lovely spot to warm up to hot drinks and enjoy homemade chocolates.

Where to Stay in Bergen and Hardangerfjord:

Staying at Ullensavang Hotel during a Bergen to Hardangerfjord road trip.

From dreamy spa hotels to luxury city escapes, there are a lot of great hotels to choose from that suit all budgets, from Bergen to Hardangerfjord.

I stayed at the Moxy Bergen on the water in the Solheim Nord area during my trip. It’s a Marriott Bonvoy hotel near Bergen Airport, the Bergen bus and train station.

Along Hardangerfjord, my friend Caitlin and I stayed at the Ullensavang Hotel in Lofthus. This hotel holds a variety of activities and water sports to enjoy along the fjord. It offers jaw-dropping views of Folgefonna Glacier, which is part of Folgefonna National Park. It’s one of the most powerful glaciers in Norway.

Below are other great hotels to stay at in Bergen and Hardangerfjord based on budget:

Bergen:

Luxury Accommodation: Opus XVI (Opus 16)

Boutique Accommodation: The Hanseatic Hotel

Mid-Budget Accommodation: Radisson Blu Royal Hotel Bergen

Budget Accommodation: HI Bergen Hostel Montana

Hardangerfjord:

Luxury Accommodation: Hotel Ullensvang

Boutique Accommodation: Brakanes Hotel

Mid-Budget Accommodation: Tyssedal Hotel

Budget Accommodation: Hardanger Hostel B&B

You can also find a variety of rental properties from Bergen to Hardangerfjord.

Road Trip from Bergen to Hardangerfjord:

A road trip from Bergen to Hardangerfjord.

Western Norway is unique and one of the best ways to experience it is by road trip from Bergen to Hardangerfjord.

Known as the second longest fjord in Norway, Hardangerfjord is one of the most breathtaking places to visit in the country. It has calming waters and panoramic views of steep mountains, dramatic waterfalls, cider farms and more.

You can visit Hardangerfjord from Bergen through various transportation options. However, renting a car and enjoying a scenic drive from Bergen is the best way to experience the area and see everything. There are a lot of beautiful spots to stop at, take photos, do tours and more.

Depending on where you’re going in Hardangerfjord, it can take you anywhere from an hour to over a two-and-a-half-hour drive from Bergen. (If you’re traveling to Ullensvang, Lofthus or Tyssedal, it will be around a two-hour and 40-minute drive from Bergen.)

The fjords of Norway.

If you plan to take public transport around Norway, you can take the Skyss bus from Bergen busstasjon to Mundheim in Hardangerfjord. Additionally, you can also do an express boat trip from Bergen to Hardangerfjord through Rødne, which has daily departures. You can also do a private day tour to Hardangerfjord from Bergen.

During your time in Hardangerfjord, you can get around by car, the Skyss bus, a fjord cruise through Norled and ferries run by Fjord1.

Please be mindful when driving from Bergen to Hardangerfjord. The roads are narrow and windy. You can also experience this breathtaking region during the train ride from Bergen to Oslo and vice versa.

See the Fantoft Stave Church:

The Fantoft Stave Church outside of Bergen.

The first thing you should do on your road trip from Bergen to Hardangerfjord is stop at Fantoft Stave Church. It’s located in the Fana borough of Bergen and is a reconstructed stave church after a 1992 arson fire that burnt down the original structure.

The old stave church was constructed in 1170 and is a large wooden structure to be admired. It will take you back in time!

You can visit the Fantoft Stave Church from mid-May through the end of September, Monday through Sunday, from 11 am to 4 pm. It costs 74 NOK for adults, 35 NOK for children and 50 NOK for students. Visiting the church is free for Bergen Card holders.

Enjoy a Hardanger Fjord Cruise:

Hardangerfjord cider region.

A visit to one of Norway’s most popular tourist destinations is incomplete without doing a fjord cruise.

There are numerous boat cruise tours you can take in Hardangerfjord. Still, some of the best things you’ll see are the stunning fjord landscapes, spectacular waterfalls, epic Trolltunga, beautiful glaciers and picturesque cideries.

What’s great about doing a fjord cruise in this region is that it usually includes visiting one or more local cideries.

Participate in a Local Cider Tasting:

Cider tasting at Alde Sider on a Bergen to Hardangerfjord road trip.

Hardanger Cider is a geographically protected brand name like the Champagne region in France. Hardangerfjord in Norway is known for its apples that have been pressed and processed to perfection for generations.

One of the best things to do in Hardangerfjord is a cider safari that will take you to several idyllic orchards. The best time to do a cider safari is during summertime. The Aurora of The Fjords will allow you to make memories while enjoying the beauty and tastes of Hardangerfjord.

If you’re doing a road trip and plan to stop at a cidery during your journey, the best place to do a tour and tasting is Alde Sider in Nå. It’s a family-owned cidery that uses Aroma apples. They were also awarded the best cider in Norway in 2018.

After a wonderful experience cider tasting at Alde Sider, a fantastic fine dining restaurant to enjoy afterward is Siderhuset Ola K. It’s set in a wooden house from 1912 that was owned by Ola K Naa who would help locals with retail, fruit delivery, mail and more. The restaurant is a unifying place for all and most Hardanger ciders are represented there.

Trolltunga during the summer.
Please note that I ended up not completing Trolltunga due to heavy fog. This is a stock image of the Troll’s Tongue on a clear summer day.

Hiking Trolltunga during a trip to Hardangerfjord from Bergen is a must, especially if you’re an adventure lover! Meaning troll’s tongue, Trolltunga is one of the most epic and breathtaking cliffs in Western Norway.

Trolltunga – Little Preikestolen is located 3,610 feet above sea level and is a 14.3-mile challenging out-and-back trail. It’s situated near the village of Tyssedal and takes around seven and a half hours to complete round-trip.

Some important information about hiking Trolltunga is that starting as early as possible, preferably no later than 8 am is best. Also, this trail is open for hikers to conquer from June 1 through September 30, but you must go with a guide from October 1 through May 31.

There is paid parking at Trolltunga with three lots. You can save yourself a lot of time by either making reservations to park at P3, where the official start of the hike is located, or take one of the many shuttles that run every half hour from 6:30 am to 7 pm from lots P2 in Skjeggedal and P1 in Tyssedal. If you finish the hike after 7 pm, you must walk down to the parking lots, which can take two to three hours.

Please note that you can make reservations for the P3 lot, but it must be done in advance since this is a heavily trafficked hike. It costs 600 NOK to park at P3. You do not need to make reservations for the P2 and P1 lots. It costs 200 NOK to park at the P2 lot.

The start of Trolltunga can be strenuous and monotonous, but it gets more exciting as you ascend. There’s a 3,113-foot elevation gain and dogs are also welcome on this trail.

Once you get to the tongue, there will most likely be a queue of people taking photos. Please note that depending on the day and weather, the line to get pictures on the tongue can be up to two hours! Weekends are always when Trolltunga draws more hikers.

A woman hiking in the fog.

Unfortunately, we didn’t have the best of luck on Trolltunga. The weather was horrible and the entire mountain was covered in a thick fog. Since you couldn’t see much of anything, we decided to make the tough decision to not continue the hike because it would’ve been a waste of a day. (We ended up spending more time at the cideries.)

Overall, the views at Trolltunga are some of the most breathtaking in Northern Europe and you’ll make memories that will last you a lifetime.

Before hiking Trolltunga, it’s best to stop at a grocery store to pick up water, snacks and a rain poncho in case of inclement weather. (Don’t forget that Norway is a rainy country.)

Having the proper hiking gear like trekking boots, a hefty day pack, hiking socks, a rain jacket/windbreaker, an insulated coat with layers, gloves, a beanie and more is also essential. Referencing my Mount Kilimanjaro packing list is a great way to be prepared for Trolltunga.

Pizza and beer from Lofthus Ekspedisjon in the Norwegian Fjords.
Fløy Bakeri in Lofthus, Norway.

After completing the Trolltunga hike, head to downtown Lofthus and treat yourself to a flight of beer or cider and pizza at Lofthus Ekspedisjon. A charming bakery in the area is Fløy Bakeri.

Visit the Best Hardanger Region Waterfalls:

Seeing waterfalls on a road trip from Bergen to Hardangerfjord.

It’s no secret that the Hardangerfjord region is named “The King of Waterfalls.” During your Bergen to Hardangerfjord road trip, you must take the time to stop at one of the many breathtaking waterfalls to take in the views, enjoy a hike, capture stunning photos and more.

Below are the best waterfalls to visit in Hardangerfjord:

Vøringsfossen: Known as the most famous waterfall in the region, Vøringsfossen is in Hardangervidda National Park and has a nearly 600-foot water plunge into the Måbødalen Valley. The best viewing platform is at Fossli Hotel.

Låtefossen in Norway.

Låtefossen: One of the most accessible waterfalls to visit in the Hardangerfjord is Låtefossen. It’s a twin waterfall in the Odda Valley, over 540 feet. Parking on the main road 13 between Odda and Rødal is the best way to see this beautiful waterfall.

Steinsdalfossen: Another enchanting waterfall to check out on a road trip from Bergen to Hardangerfjord is Steinsdalsfossen. What’s cool about visiting this 164-foot waterfall is that you can walk behind it!


The Old Town of Bergen, Norway.

Check out these other awesome articles:

14 Best Countries to Visit in August in the World

The Best Cabin in Norway: An Escape to Stord Island

Things to do in Andorra from Barcelona

I hope you all enjoyed discovering the best things to do during a Bergen to Hardangerfjord road trip. If you have any questions, please email me at info@browneyedflowerchild.com.

Basic Facts of Norway:

Currency: Norwegian Krone, Capital: Oslo, Time Zone: Central European Standard Time

*Anything could happen during your travels. Always make sure you are insured in case there are unforeseen circumstances such as lost luggage/theft, natural disasters, personal liabilities and more. Click here to get insured for your next trip.

In addition, a great and secure luggage storage to utilize during your summer Europe trip is Nannybag! It is easy to use; all you do is download the Nannybag app, type in the city that you will be visiting and when you plan to arrive and depart. At a small cost per luggage, Nannybag will list the stores, restaurants or hotels where you could drop your bag off at the city you are visiting.

Nannybag is also insured against theft, loss and breakage. It’s a convenient way to store your bags when you are traveling from one city to the next in Europe.

Shop my Norwegian Fjords Look:

Click here to shop my Poshmark closet!

2 Comments

  1. Kim Deer on October 11, 2023 at 10:18 pm

    Great article Taylor on the beautiful Norwegian Fjords! Looks like you saw some breathtaking landscapes. I loved all the cool architecture ~ great guide for an awesome road trip in Norway. Love you, mom 👩🏻 xoxo 💖

    • Taylor Deer on October 13, 2023 at 9:10 am

      Thank you mom! The Norwegian Fjords are the highlight of visiting Norway.

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